Male Body Image Is An Issue Too

For years there have been hundreds, even thousands of campaigns used to promote a positive body image for women in the entertainment and fashion industries. Here at Fashom, we too have worked hard to introduce a positive self-image to women around the world who might not have had the tools to manifest one for themselves.

Ashley Graham via stylishcurves.com

Companies in beauty, fashion, and entertainment have taken tremendous strides in the past decade on dismantling the “ideal woman” image. Still lingering, however, is one outdated misconception about body image: Men don’t care about it. In 1965, sure, it makes sense for there to be an absence of campaigns about men loving themselves, but it’s 2017 and America is not in the middle of the Vietnam War. It is a time in history where the mindset of men is well past starting a family and providing for it in some grimy, ‘manly’ nine-to-five.

Our question is: when will the standard change? Where is the Dove beauty patch experiment for men? Perhaps this is a question company should be asking themselves. Every day, men all over the world battle the ideal male prototype that stands 6’2” with a chiseled stomach and ridiculous flowing hair. They may not be as outspoken about it as those spearheading women’s body positive campaigns, but that’s because men have been programmed not to talk about these issues and to “suck it up”.

Tommy Lee Jones in “Coal Miners Daughter” 1980

Zach Miko, IMG’s first male plus-sized model
Via dailymail.co.uk

Although plus-sized men may not deal with every issue that plus-sized women must fight through, they still share issues on their own. Bigger men find it harder to build up a wardrobe, have to grow up dealing with ‘fat jokes’ and belittlement because of their weight. But as a man, talking about your own insecurities openly is un-masculine or a sign of weakness – issues that a woman doesn’t have to deal with.

While defending the male body image is not a heavily publicized movement, it doesn’t mean that there aren’t people or organizations out there looking to shed more light on the issue. Take into consideration sites like goodmenproject.com, naafaonline.com, chubstr.com, and notoriouslydapper.com just to name a few.

Media outlets like Chubstr and Good Men Project are examples that we would like to see a lot more of at Fashom. Women aren’t the only ones struggling with body image and there is enough research to prove it.

If you liked this post or have a strong opinion on this issue let us know in the comments and on social media!

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